Be one of the first to learn about LUPKYNIS (voclosporin)!

Hear from expert rheumatologists and nephrologists as they discuss key clinical information in a live, virtual series

Attend the speaker series: Introduction to LUPKYNIS

Learn more about our speakers by viewing their biographies

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Cristina G. Arriens, MD, MSCS

Cristina G. Arriens, MD, MSCS, is a clinical assistant member of Arthritis & Clinical Immunology and principal investigator at Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

Dr. Arriens received her medical degree from University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas, Texas. She completed an internal medicine residency at University of New Mexico School of Medicine in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and a clinical fellowship in rheumatology at University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, where she also received a master’s degree in clinical science and completed a postdoctoral clinical research fellowship.

Her research interests in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) involve a molecular investigation of biomarkers and use of this knowledge to assist guidance of therapy. She is a member of numerous medical societies, including American College of Rheumatology, Lupus Nephritis Trials Network, and Lupus Clinical Investigator Network-SLE Treatment Acceleration Trials.

She is a frequent presenter at medical meetings and has published in peer-reviewed journals, including Lupus Science & Medicine, Rheumatology (Oxford), International Journal of Clinical Rheumatology, and Clinical Immunology.

Cristina Arriens portrait

Clinical Assistant Member, Arthritis & Clinical Immunology
Principal Investigator
Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation
Oklahoma City, OK

Dawn J. Caster, MD, FASN

Dawn J. Caster, MD, FASN, is assistant professor in the Division of Nephrology at University of Louisville (UofL) in Louisville, Kentucky.

Dr. Caster received her medical degree from University of Louisville School of Medicine, where she went on to complete an internal medicine residency, nephrology fellowship, and research fellowship. She is board certified in internal medicine and nephrology.

She is director of the University of Louisville Glomerular Disease Clinic. Her areas of expertise include lupus nephritis and management of glomerular diseases. She is a member of numerous medical societies and committees, including Greater Louisville Medical Society, American Society of Nephrology, Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) Glomerular Disease Controversies Conference Steering Committee, Standardised Outcomes in Nephrology – Glomerular Disease (SONG-GD) Steering Committee, and the Lupus Foundation of America Medical Scientific Advisory Council. She conducts translational research in lupus nephritis and is the recipient of an NIH K08 career development award.

Dr. Caster is a frequent presenter at medical meetings. She has published book chapters, abstracts, and posters as well as articles in many peer-reviewed journals, including Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, Advances in Chronic Kidney Disease, and Kidney International.

Dawn Caster portrait

Assistant Professor
Department of Medicine
Division of Nephrology
University of Louisville
Louisville, KY

Joshua M. Kaplan, MD

Joshua M. Kaplan, MD, is associate professor of nephrology and hypertension in the Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Department of Medicine, at New Jersey Medical School, Rutgers University in Newark, New Jersey.

Dr. Kaplan received his medical degree from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York. He completed his residency in internal medicine at New York University/Bellevue Hospitals followed by a fellowship in nephrology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts.

He is board certified in internal medicine and nephrology and is a member of the American Society of Nephrology. His clinical interests include renal replacement, nocturnal hemodialysis, and acute renal failure.

He is an editorial board member of The Nephrology Self-Assessment Program (NephSAP), American Society of Nephrology. NephSAP is a learning vehicle for clinical nephrologists to refresh their clinical knowledge, diagnostic, and therapeutic skills.

Dr. Kaplan has published book chapters and abstracts as well as articles in numerous journals, including The New England Journal of Medicine, International Journal of Molecular Sciences, Diagnostic Microbiology and Infectious Disease, among others. He also presents at medical meetings.

Joshua Kaplan portrait

Associate Professor of Nephrology and Hypertension
Division of Nephrology and Hypertension
Department of Medicine
New Jersey Medical School
Rutgers University
Newark, NJ

Alfred H. Kim, MD, PhD

Alfred H. Kim, MD, PhD, is assistant professor of medicine, pathology, and immunology in the Division of Rheumatology, School of Medicine at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri. He is also the co-director of the Lupus Clinic.

Dr. Kim received his medical and doctoral degree of immunology from Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He is board certified in rheumatology.

Dr. Kim runs an independent research group with several clinical and translational projects addressing the major unmet needs of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). He also manages a diverse cohort of patients assembled through the Washington University Lupus Clinic. Finally, Dr. Kim’s team also manages a Lupus Registry, which includes data for disease activity assessment, laboratory values, socioeconomic factors, and a wide variety of patient-reported outcomes related to quality of life.

He is a member of the American College of Rheumatology and the Scientific Advisory Committee of the Rheumatology Research Foundation. He is also on the board of directors of the Lupus Foundation of America, Heartland Chapter, and is president of the Saint Louis Rheumatology Association. Dr. Kim is the recipient of numerous honors and awards, including the Rheumatology Research Foundation Investigator Award.

He has published in numerous journals, including JCI Insight, Arthritis & Rheumatology, The Journal of Immunology, and Annals of Rheumatic Diseases.

Alfred Kim portrait

Assistant Professor, Medicine
Division of Rheumatology
Washington University School of Medicine

Co-director
Lupus Clinic
Washington University School of Medicine
St. Louis, MO

Donald E. Thomas, Jr., MD, FACP, FACR, RhMSUS, CCD

Donald E. Thomas, Jr., MD, FACP, FACR, RhMSUS, CCD, is a rheumatologist and principal investigator at Arthritis and Pain Associates of Prince George’s County, in Maryland, and also is an associate professor of clinical medicine, the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, in Bethesda, Maryland.

He received his medical degree from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, and completed his rheumatology fellowship at Walter Reed Army Medical Center.

He is a fellow of the American Board of College of Physicians and the American College of Rheumatology.

He authored The Lupus Encyclopedia: A Comprehensive Guide for Patients and Families from The Johns Hopkins University Press. Dr. Thomas is a chair emeritus of the Medical and Scientific Advisory Board of the Lupus Foundation (DC/MD/VA) chapter, was a member of the Medical Advisory Council of The Arthritis Foundation Mid-Atlantic Chapter, was president of the Rheumatism Society of the District of Columbia (2016-2017), and is chair of the national board of directors of the Sjogren’s Foundation.

He is the recipient of numerous awards, including the “Lupus Hero Award” in 2016 from the Lupus Foundation of America DC/MD/VA Chapter.

Donald Thomas portrait

Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine
Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences
Bethesda, MD

James A. Tumlin, MD

James A. Tumlin, MD, is director of clinical research at Georgia Nephrology, and professor of medicine in the Renal Division at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia.

Dr. Tumlin received his medical degree from University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine in Tampa, Florida. He completed his internal medicine residency and his nephrology fellowship at Emory University School of Medicine. He is board certified in internal medicine and nephrology.

His research interests include acute kidney injury, immune complex glomerulonephritis, and racial differences in renal allograft survival. He is an invited committee member of the DEVINE Team, a multinational research initiative for focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and IgA nephropathy. He is also active in many medical societies, including American Medical Association, American College of Physicians, American Society of Nephrology, International Society of Nephrology, and is the founder and medical director of NephroNet Clinical Trials Consortium.

Dr. Tumlin has received numerous awards, including the Tennessee Governor’s Task Force on Chronic Kidney Disease (2009 to present), “Best Doctors in America” (2009 to present), “Who’s Who in American Medicine” (2010 to present), and the American Men and Women of Science (2014 to present).

He has publications in book chapters, abstracts, and more than 100 journals, such as The American Journal of Medicine, Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, and Kidney International. He is a frequent speaker at medical meetings.

James Tumlin portrait

Director, Clinical Research
Georgia Nephrology

Professor of Medicine, Renal Division
Emory University
Atlanta, GA

INDICATIONS

LUPKYNIS is indicated in combination with a background immunosuppressive therapy regimen for the treatment of adult patients with active lupus nephritis (LN). Limitations of Use: Safety and efficacy of LUPKYNIS have not been established in combination with cyclophosphamide. Use of LUPKYNIS is not recommended in this situation.


IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

BOXED WARNINGS: MALIGNANCIES AND SERIOUS INFECTIONS

Increased risk for developing malignancies and serious infections with LUPKYNIS or other immunosuppressants that may lead to hospitalization or death.

CONTRAINDICATIONS: LUPKYNIS is contraindicated in patients taking strong CYP3A4 inhibitors because of the increased risk of acute and/or chronic nephrotoxicity, and in patients who have had a serious/severe hypersensitivity reaction to LUPKYNIS or its excipients.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Lymphoma and Other Malignancies: Immunosuppressants, including LUPKYNIS, increase the risk of developing lymphomas and other malignancies, particularly of the skin. The risk appears to be related to increasing doses and duration of immunosuppression rather than to the use of any specific agent.

Serious Infections: Immunosuppressants, including LUPKYNIS, increase the risk of developing bacterial, viral, fungal, and protozoal infections (including opportunistic infections), which may lead to serious, including fatal, outcomes.

Nephrotoxicity: LUPKYNIS, like other calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs), may cause acute and/or chronic nephrotoxicity. The risk is increased when CNIs are concomitantly administered with drugs associated with nephrotoxicity.

Hypertension: Hypertension is a common adverse reaction of LUPKYNIS therapy and may require antihypertensive therapy.

Neurotoxicity: LUPKYNIS, like other CNIs, may cause a spectrum of neurotoxicities: severe include posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), delirium, seizure, and coma; others include tremor, paresthesia, headache, and changes in mental status and/or motor and sensory functions.

Hyperkalemia: Hyperkalemia, which may be serious and require treatment, has been reported with CNIs, including LUPKYNIS. Concomitant use of agents associated with hyperkalemia may increase the risk for hyperkalemia.

QTc Prolongation: LUPKYNIS prolongs the QTc interval in a dose-dependent manner when dosed higher than the recommended lupus nephritis therapeutic dose. The use of LUPKYNIS in combination with other drugs that are known to prolong QTc may result in clinically significant QT prolongation.

Immunizations: Avoid the use of live attenuated vaccines during treatment with LUPKYNIS. Inactivated vaccines noted to be safe for administration may not be sufficiently immunogenic during treatment with LUPKYNIS.

Pure Red Cell Aplasia: Cases of pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) have been reported in patients treated with another CNI immunosuppressant. If PRCA is diagnosed, consider discontinuation of LUPKYNIS.

Drug-Drug Interactions: Avoid co-administration of LUPKYNIS and strong CYP3A4 inhibitors or with strong or moderate CYP3A4 inducers. Reduce LUPKYNIS dosage when co-administered with moderate CYP3A4 inhibitors. Reduce dosage of certain P-gp substrates with narrow therapeutic windows when co-administered.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

The most common adverse reactions (≥3%) were glomerular filtration rate decreased, hypertension, diarrhea, headache, anemia, cough, urinary tract infection, abdominal pain upper, dyspepsia, alopecia, renal impairment, abdominal pain, mouth ulceration, fatigue, tremor, acute kidney injury, and decreased appetite.

SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

Pregnancy/Lactation: May cause fetal harm. Advise not to breastfeed.

Renal Impairment: Not recommended in patients with baseline eGFR ≤45 mL/min/1.73 m2 unless benefit exceeds risk. If used in this population, reduce LUPKYNIS dose.

Hepatic Impairment: For mild or moderate hepatic impairment, reduce LUPKYNIS dose. Avoid use with severe hepatic impairment.


Please see Prescribing Information including Boxed Warning and Medication Guide for LUPKYNIS.

INDICATIONS

LUPKYNIS is indicated in combination with a background immunosuppressive therapy regimen for the treatment of adult patients with active lupus nephritis (LN). Limitations of Use: Safety and efficacy of LUPKYNIS have not been established in combination with cyclophosphamide. Use of LUPKYNIS is not recommended in this situation.


IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

BOXED WARNINGS: MALIGNANCIES AND SERIOUS INFECTIONS

Increased risk for developing malignancies and serious infections with LUPKYNIS or other immunosuppressants that may lead to hospitalization or death.

CONTRAINDICATIONS: LUPKYNIS is contraindicated in patients taking strong CYP3A4 inhibitors because of the increased risk of acute and/or chronic nephrotoxicity, and in patients who have had a serious/severe hypersensitivity reaction to LUPKYNIS or its excipients.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

Lymphoma and Other Malignancies: Immunosuppressants, including LUPKYNIS, increase the risk of developing lymphomas and other malignancies, particularly of the skin. The risk appears to be related to increasing doses and duration of immunosuppression rather than to the use of any specific agent.

Serious Infections: Immunosuppressants, including LUPKYNIS, increase the risk of developing bacterial, viral, fungal, and protozoal infections (including opportunistic infections), which may lead to serious, including fatal, outcomes.

Nephrotoxicity: LUPKYNIS, like other calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs), may cause acute and/or chronic nephrotoxicity. The risk is increased when CNIs are concomitantly administered with drugs associated with nephrotoxicity.

Hypertension: Hypertension is a common adverse reaction of LUPKYNIS therapy and may require antihypertensive therapy.

Neurotoxicity: LUPKYNIS, like other CNIs, may cause a spectrum of neurotoxicities: severe include posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), delirium, seizure, and coma; others include tremor, paresthesia, headache, and changes in mental status and/or motor and sensory functions.

Hyperkalemia: Hyperkalemia, which may be serious and require treatment, has been reported with CNIs, including LUPKYNIS. Concomitant use of agents associated with hyperkalemia may increase the risk for hyperkalemia.

QTc Prolongation: LUPKYNIS prolongs the QTc interval in a dose-dependent manner when dosed higher than the recommended lupus nephritis therapeutic dose. The use of LUPKYNIS in combination with other drugs that are known to prolong QTc may result in clinically significant QT prolongation.

Immunizations: Avoid the use of live attenuated vaccines during treatment with LUPKYNIS. Inactivated vaccines noted to be safe for administration may not be sufficiently immunogenic during treatment with LUPKYNIS.

Pure Red Cell Aplasia: Cases of pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) have been reported in patients treated with another CNI immunosuppressant. If PRCA is diagnosed, consider discontinuation of LUPKYNIS.

Drug-Drug Interactions: Avoid co-administration of LUPKYNIS and strong CYP3A4 inhibitors or with strong or moderate CYP3A4 inducers. Reduce LUPKYNIS dosage when co-administered with moderate CYP3A4 inhibitors. Reduce dosage of certain P-gp substrates with narrow therapeutic windows when co-administered.

ADVERSE REACTIONS

The most common adverse reactions (≥3%) were glomerular filtration rate decreased, hypertension, diarrhea, headache, anemia, cough, urinary tract infection, abdominal pain upper, dyspepsia, alopecia, renal impairment, abdominal pain, mouth ulceration, fatigue, tremor, acute kidney injury, and decreased appetite.

SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

Pregnancy/Lactation: May cause fetal harm. Advise not to breastfeed.

Renal Impairment: Not recommended in patients with baseline eGFR ≤45 mL/min/1.73 m2 unless benefit exceeds risk. If used in this population, reduce LUPKYNIS dose.

Hepatic Impairment: For mild or moderate hepatic impairment, reduce LUPKYNIS dose. Avoid use with severe hepatic impairment.


Please see Prescribing Information including Boxed Warning and Medication Guide for LUPKYNIS.